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Relationship between plasma cholesterol level and coronary atherosclerosis in cholesterol-oil fed cockerels

  • C. Kakita
    Affiliations
    Cardiovascular Institute and Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, Ill. 60516 U.S.A.
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  • P.J. Johnson
    Affiliations
    Cardiovascular Institute and Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, Ill. 60516 U.S.A.
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  • R. Pick
    Affiliations
    Cardiovascular Institute and Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, Ill. 60516 U.S.A.
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  • L.N. Katz
    Affiliations
    Cardiovascular Institute and Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, Ill. 60516 U.S.A.
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      Abstract

      In short-term experiments in cockerels, elevation of plasma cholesterol from threshold to excessively high levels induces coronary atherosclerosis in a curvilinear fashion with the largest effect occurring in the lower ranges (from 100–500 mg/100 ml). Similar increments of plasma cholesterol have a progressively smaller effect on coronary atherosclerosis as the plasma cholesterol levels become higher. However, the results of long-term experiments may differ from the short-term ones used in these experiments.
      These experiments have a possible bearing on the efficacy of hypocholesterolemic procedures clinically.
      The nomogram established in this report can serve in this species (and at this age and over this duration of the experiment) to distinguish coronary atherogenesis dependent on hypercholesterolemia (per se) from that produced independently by the agent or procedure employed.

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