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The action of human high density lipoprotein on cholesterol crystals Part 2. Biochemical observations

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      Abstract

      Electron microscopy of the reaction product between human pooled high density lipoprotein (HDL) and cholesterol shows that characteristic liposome macromicellar bodies are formed. These bodies vary in size between 30 and 1200 nm. In comparison with HDL, they contain markedly more cholesterol, but less protein and phospholipid. Their phospholipid pattern shows enrichment with sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine in comparison with HDL.

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