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Associations of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) mass concentrations with exercise, weight loss, and plasma lipoprotein subfraction concentrations in men

  • Paul T. Williams
    Correspondence
    Correspondence to: Paul T. Williams, Ph.D., Research Medicine and Radiation Biology Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Bldg. 934, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A.
    Affiliations
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, U.S.A.

    Research Medicine and Radiation Biology Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.
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  • John J. Albers
    Affiliations
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, U.S.A.

    Research Medicine and Radiation Biology Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.
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  • Ronald M. Krauss
    Affiliations
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, U.S.A.

    Research Medicine and Radiation Biology Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.
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  • Peter D.S. Wood
    Affiliations
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, U.S.A.

    Research Medicine and Radiation Biology Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.
    Search for articles by this author
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      Abstract

      The relationships between plasma lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) mass concentrations and lipids, apolipoprotein, and lipoprotein subfraction concentrations were studied in men assigned at random to a one-year exercise program (n = 48) and to a sedentary control condition (n = 31). Exercise training did not significantly affect mean concentrations of LCAT-mass. Moreover changes in LCAT within the exercise group were unrelated to distance run and weight loss. The baseline data and the one-year change data showed consistent positive correlations between LCAT concentrations and total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B concentrations, and consistently weak correlations between LCAT concentrations and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, HDL2, and apolipoprotein A-I concentrations. The strong correlation between LCAT and total cholesterol may account for LCAT's relationships with lipoprotein subfractions, apolipoprotein B and other lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

      Keywords

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