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Association analysis between polymorphisms of the lymphotoxin-α gene and myocardial infarction in a Japanese population

      Recently, a genome-wide association study revealed that variants in the lymphotoxin-α gene (LTA) are risk factors for myocardial infarction (MI), based on the multiplex PCR-Invader assay method at 92788 randomly selected gene-based SNPs [
      • Ozaki K.
      • Ohnishi Y.
      • Iida A.
      • Sekine A.
      • Yamada R.
      • Tsunoda T.
      • et al.
      Functional SNPs in the lymphotoxin-alpha gene that are associated with susceptibility to myocardial infarction.
      ]. It has also been shown that, in in vitro functional analyses, these variants might have some functional significance and that LTA may play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. However, association studies are plagued by the impression that they are not consistently reproducible [
      • Cardon L.R.
      • Bell J.I.
      Association study designs for complex diseases.
      ,
      • Lohmueller K.E.
      • Pearce C.L.
      • Pike M.
      • Lander E.S.
      • Hirschhorn J.N.
      Meta-analysis of genetic association studies supports a contribution of common variants to susceptibility to common disease.
      ]. Moreover, direct evidence of the contribution of LTA to atherogenesis is limited in both animals and humans [
      • Schreyer S.A.
      • Vick C.M.
      • LeBoeuf R.C.
      Loss of lymphotoxin-alpha but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha reduces atherosclerosis in mice.
      ]. Therefore, we performed an association analysis between polymorphisms of LTA and MI in a Japanese population.
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