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Endogenous CETP activity as a predictor of cardiovascular risk: Determination of the optimal range

  • Elise F. Villard
    Affiliations
    INSERM UMRS939, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Université Pierre et Marie Curie–Paris6, Paris, France

    ICAN Institute of CardioMetabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Marie-Christine Federspiel
    Affiliations
    Departement of Metabolic Biochemistry, AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Corinne Cherfils
    Affiliations
    Departement of Metabolic Biochemistry, AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Valérie Fesel-Fouquier
    Affiliations
    Departement of Metabolic Biochemistry, AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Eric Bruckert
    Affiliations
    INSERM UMRS939, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Université Pierre et Marie Curie–Paris6, Paris, France

    ICAN Institute of CardioMetabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Department of Endocrinology, AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Karine Clement
    Affiliations
    ICAN Institute of CardioMetabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    INSERM UMRS872, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France
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  • Dominique Bonnefont-Rousselot
    Affiliations
    Departement of Metabolic Biochemistry, AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Department of Experimental, Metabolic and Clinical Biology EA4466, Faculty of Pharmacy, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France
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  • Wilfried Le Goff
    Affiliations
    INSERM UMRS939, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Université Pierre et Marie Curie–Paris6, Paris, France

    ICAN Institute of CardioMetabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Randa Bittar
    Affiliations
    INSERM UMRS939, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Université Pierre et Marie Curie–Paris6, Paris, France

    Departement of Metabolic Biochemistry, AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Philippe Couvert
    Affiliations
    INSERM UMRS939, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Université Pierre et Marie Curie–Paris6, Paris, France

    ICAN Institute of CardioMetabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
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  • Maryse Guerin
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. INSERM UMRS 939, Hôpital de la Pitié, Pavillon Benjamin Delessert, 83 boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France. Tel.: +33 1 42 17 79 77; fax: +33 1 45 82 81 98.
    Affiliations
    INSERM UMRS939, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

    Université Pierre et Marie Curie–Paris6, Paris, France

    ICAN Institute of CardioMetabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France
    Search for articles by this author

      Abstract

      Objectives

      To identify key determinants of plasma endogenous CETP activity and threshold value of plasma CETP activity associated with high cardiovascular risk.

      Methods

      Endogenous plasma CETP activity was measured in a total of 1403 individuals.

      Results

      Multivariate analysis revealed that 23.5% of endogenous CETP activity variability was explained by plasma LDL-C (12.0%), HDL-C (6.4%) and TG (4.4%) whereas sex and BMI accounted together for only 0.7% of its variability. Scoring patients for cardiovascular risk on the basis of their plasma lipid levels (TC, TG, LDL-C and HDL-C), revealed that patients with high cardiovascular risk (score ≥3) displayed a mean endogenous plasma CETP activity above 34%.

      Conclusion

      Plasma CETP activity represents a potent indicator of cardiovascular risk in patients with metabolic disorders since it integrates major independent risk factors.

      Highlights

      • LDL-C, HDL-C and TG represent strong and independent predictors of plasma CETP activity.
      • CETP activity integrates major plasma lipid levels known as independent risk factors.
      • A plasma CETP activity above 34% is associated with an elevated cardiovascular risk.
      • A CETP activity between 22% and 34% represents the future clinical therapeutic goal.

      Keywords

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