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The “cholesterol paradox” in patients with mastocytosis

      Indhirajanti et al. have documented that in some patients with mastocytosis there is a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events. This basic data serves the authors to highlight how mast cells contribute to the destabilization of atherosclerotic lesion and cardiovascular events, despite the low levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol [
      • Indhirajanti S.
      • van Daele P.L.A.
      • Bos S.
      • Mulder M.T.
      • Bot I.
      • Roeters van Lennep J.E.
      Systemic mastocytosis associates with cardiovascular events despite lower plasma lipid levels.
      ].

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      Linked Article

      • Systemic mastocytosis associates with cardiovascular events despite lower plasma lipid levels
        AtherosclerosisVol. 268
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          Mast cells have been implicated in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in animal models and human autopsy studies. However, it is unknown whether long-term exposure to excess of mast cells is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in humans. Our objective was to compare the prevalence of CVD and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) and controls.
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      • Reply to: “The “cholesterol paradox” in patients with mastocytosis”
        AtherosclerosisVol. 284
        • Preview
          We read with interest the Letter to the Editor “The “cholesterol paradox” in patients with mastocytosis” by Feminò and Feminò [1] and we would like to thank the authors for their vision on our recently published data [2]. In our paper, we have found a significantly higher prevalence of cardiovascular events in patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM), which is a disease characterized by the accumulation of mast cells in one or more organs, compared to matched control subjects. Remarkably, we observed significantly lower circulating total and LDL cholesterol levels in patients with SM compared to the controls.
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