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Spousal similarities in cardiometabolic risk factors: A cross-sectional comparison between Dutch and Japanese data from two large biobank studies

  • Author Footnotes
    1 These first authors contributed equally to this work.
    Naoki Nakaya
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. 2-1 Seiryo, Sendai 980-8573, Japan.
    Footnotes
    1 These first authors contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan

    Department of Health Science, Saitama Prefectural University, Japan
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These first authors contributed equally to this work.
    Tian Xie
    Footnotes
    1 These first authors contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
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  • Bart Scheerder
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands

    Center for Development & Innovation, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands
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  • Naho Tsuchiya
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
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  • Akira Narita
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Tomohiro Nakamura
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
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  • Hirohito Metoki
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Division of Public Health, Hygiene and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Taku Obara
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan

    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan
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  • Mami Ishikuro
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
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  • Atsushi Hozawa
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 These last authors contributed equally to this work.
    Harold Snieder
    Footnotes
    2 These last authors contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 These last authors contributed equally to this work.
    Shinichi Kuriyama
    Footnotes
    2 These last authors contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan

    Department of Disaster Public Health, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These first authors contributed equally to this work.
    2 These last authors contributed equally to this work.

      Highlights

      • Spousal concordance was observed for several cardiometabolic risk factors.
      • Men had increased hypertension risk if their wives had the same disease.
      • Interventions targeting spouses, rather than individuals, may be more effective.

      Abstract

      Background and aims

      Few studies have examined and compared spousal concordance in different populations. This study aimed to quantify and compare spousal similarities in cardiometabolic risk factors and diseases between Dutch and Japanese populations.

      Methods

      This cross-sectional study included 28,265 Dutch Lifelines Cohort Study spouse pairs (2006–2013) and 5,391 Japanese Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo) Cohort Study pairs (2013–2016). Spousal similarities in cardiometabolic risk factors were evaluated using Pearson's correlation or logistic regression analyses adjusted for spousal age.

      Results

      The husbands' and wives’ average ages in the Lifelines and ToMMo cohorts were 50.0 and 47.7 years and 63.2 and 60.4 years, respectively. Significant spousal similarities occurred with all cardiometabolic risk factors and diseases of interest in both cohorts. The age-adjusted correlation coefficients ranged from 0.032 to 0.263, with the strongest correlations observed in anthropometric traits. Spousal odds ratios [95% confidence interval] for the Lifelines vs. ToMMo cohort ranged from 1.45 (1.36–1.55) vs. 1.20 (1.05–1.38) for hypertension to 6.86 (6.30–7.48) vs. 4.60 (3.52–6.02) for current smoking. An increasing trend in spousal concordance with age was observed for sufficient physical activity in both cohorts. For current smoking, those aged 20–39 years showed the strongest concordance between pairs in both cohorts. The Dutch pairs showed stronger similarities in anthropometric traits and lifestyle habits (smoking and drinking) than their Japanese counterparts.

      Conclusions

      Spouses showed similarities in several cardiometabolic risk factors among Dutch and Japanese populations, with regional and cultural influences on spousal similarities.

      Graphical abstract

      Keywords

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