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Plasma cholesterol concentration in normal and cholesterol-fed rabbits

Its variation and heritability
  • D.C.K. Roberts
    Affiliations
    Department of Experimental Pathology and Animal Breeding Establishment, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, P.O. Box 334, Canberra City, A.C.T., 2601 (Australia)
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  • C.E. West
    Affiliations
    Department of Experimental Pathology and Animal Breeding Establishment, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, P.O. Box 334, Canberra City, A.C.T., 2601 (Australia)
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  • Author Footnotes
    * Present address: Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3052 (Australia)
    T.G. Redgrave
    Footnotes
    * Present address: Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3052 (Australia)
    Affiliations
    Department of Experimental Pathology and Animal Breeding Establishment, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, P.O. Box 334, Canberra City, A.C.T., 2601 (Australia)
    Search for articles by this author
  • J.B. Smith
    Affiliations
    Department of Experimental Pathology and Animal Breeding Establishment, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, P.O. Box 334, Canberra City, A.C.T., 2601 (Australia)
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  • Author Footnotes
    * Present address: Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3052 (Australia)
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      Summary

      Sudies of a large population of normal rabbits have shown a wide range of plasma cholesterol concentration. This variation is primarily associated with sex, age and season. The plasma cholesterol concentration:
        o.
      • (a)
        is higher in females than males,
      • (b)
        decreases with age in males and is unchanged in females,
      • (c)
        shows greater seasonal variation in females than males,
      • (d)
        is lower in pregnant and lactating females than in non-pregnant, non-lactating females.
      Male and female rabbits show a positive correlation between initial plasma cholesterol concentration and the increase observed after 3 weeks on a diet containing added cholesterol.
      A controlled breeding trial from selected hyper-responding and hypo-responding parents established that the cholesterolaemic response to dietary cholesterol is heritable. the heritability, estimated from the regression of progency response on midtarent response, is 50±4.7%. It is suggested that the transmission of the character for cholesterolaemia is polygenic.

      Key words

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